Discuss Divinity Original Sin, as well as comments posted to our Divinity Original Sin Wiki and Divinity Original Sin 2 Wiki
By Anonymous
#16396981
Adding concrete melee and ranged weapon examples would be nice. Also adding a section on status effect damages and teleportation damage makes this a comprehensive reference.
By Anonymous
#16766644
There's pages on the wiki for specifics like status effects and skill damage. This is just a summary of how damage is calculated
By Anonymous
#16764540
I did some testing and calculations with damage, the TL;DR is that the objectively most efficient way to increase your damage is to level your bonuses from your attribute, elemental damage (including warfare for physical), and if applicable critical hit and high ground, equally. Attributes however can be leveled up to 40 while skills can only go to 10, and not every attack will critical or be taken from high ground, so this impractical in practice. However, it does mean that when adding stats to your gear, adding a point to your elemental skill will nearly always be more beneficial than adding an additional point of your main attribute.

As an example, with 40 points in your main attribute and 10 points in your elemental skill, 1 additional point into the elemental skill is worth nearly 2 points in the main attribute. At 60 points in your attribute, 1 elemental skill is worth nearly 3.5 attribute points. It should be noted that weapon skills are calculated essential the same as an additional point of your attribute for the calculation so it is in most cases less efficient unless you want the secondary stat it provides (like the reduction to the dual wielding penalty for instance).

Second, critical hit and high ground start off with a bonus of 50% and 20% respectively. This means that leveling critical damage is most effective only after your elemental skill damage (i.e. pyro, warfare, etc.) hits 50% (10 points in the tree), and leveling Huntsman is most effective after leveling your elemental skill damage hits 20% (4 points in the tree). Keep in mind those bonuses are conditional; if the attack is not from height or doesn't crit, no benefit is gained from those points. it's also worth pointing out many builds need points in these skill to unlock abilities, which naturally should be prioritized.

In summary, maxing out your main attribute and main elemental skill is the most effective method for increasing damage. Weapon skills can often be avoided as points spent in other skills will net larger gains. When adding points in the late game, a point of your elemental class can be worth more than a point in your main attribute.
By Anonymous
#16803370
I'm quite sure it is very wrong. Warfare gives more than weapon skills in terms of damage, but this is not how the formula here works - it just makes it equal. You can check in-game using mirror, to see how your damage looks like when weapon skill is maxed vs warfare is maxed. To prove it contradicts the formula :

For base damage 100, weapon skill 10, warfare 0, artibute 10 (0 bonus) :
100 * (1+0) * (1+0+0.5+0) * (1+0+0) = 100*1.5 = 150


For base damage 100, weapon skill 0, warfare 10, atribute 10 (0 bonus):
100 * (1+0.5) * (1+0+0+0) * (1+0+0) = 150*1 = 150

Overmore, for skills : it is most benificial to invest mostly to warfare, then a bit to weapon - but idk exacktly about proportions, especially when it could be base damage depentant.
By Anonymous
#16803371
Some extra info on damage from STR-based one handed weapon from testing :
str . weapon skill . warfare -> damage range

0 . 0 . 0 -> 6-7
10 . 0 . 0 -> 9-11
0 . 5 . 0 -> 8-9
5 . 5 . 0 -> 9-11
5 . 0 . 5 -> 10-12
0 . 0 . 5 -> 8-9
5 . 2 . 3 -> 11-12
0 . 2 . 3 -> 9-10
By Anonymous
#16809735
You are wrong. Warfare only gives more damage than weapon skills because you have str. If you don't, they give the exact same value.
By Anonymous
#16809737
You are wrong lol.

First of all, warfare does not give more than weapon skills in terms of damage in a vacuum, it only does so because it amplifies the effects of str while weapon skill does not, which should be quite obvious if you look at the formula given by this page.

Second, instead of trying and failing to theorycraft, you might want to input the stats you quoted and test it out first. It actually works as the formula you wrote but decided is wrong for some reason.